Tag Archives: Candies

Book update: 70s pop

The latest book update sees me still stuck in the 70s, but this time looking into the pop music of the era rather than rock. I’ve written about this in The Japan Times, and the stuff in my book basically goes over the same ground, but it’s a good period and deserves writing about. It’s not directly relevant to any discussion about the contemporary alternative music scene, but it’s relevant to discussion about idol music, which is relevant, as well as to new wave given the way they started to converge in the 80s and eventually completely subsumed each other to create J-pop.Yumi Arai: Rouge no Dengen

It was also relevant to talk about “new music”, which means a bunch of artists I have no particular interest in. I’m a great admirer of Yumi Arai/Matsutoya and Miyuki Nakajima has a place in my heart thanks to the use of her crazy, melodramatic power ballads as the theme songs to series 1 and 2 of the downright psychotic 90s TV drama Ienakiko. Amii Ozaki did some good stuff but Yosui Inoue always bored me and Southern Allstars are simply dire, so I have mixed feelings about the whole thing really. I put it down to its roots in Japanese “hikikatari” folk balladeering, which is a kind of music I’ve always found on the cusp between boring and annoying. As I said though, there’s good stuff in new music, but it ain’t really my scene.

I’m very biased towards female singers in this period, which is probably primarily down to me being a guy, although honestly, male Japanese pop singers do tend to be a bunch of smug, punchbag-faced twats who take themselves way too seriously considering how shallow and inconsequential their music is. Let’s face it though, Hiromi Go was a funky, funky dude in his day.Hiromi Go: Hana to Mitsubachi

But yeah, I’m standing by my position that the girls got all the best songs. I’m a massive fan of Saori Minami and she’s interesting because of her position as a prototype of the contemporary idol singer, although she never liked being presented as such. Her songwriters were on her side and they came up with some ace tunes.Saori Minami: Junketsu

Momoe Yamaguchi was probably the greatest pop star of her day, and while these days I think the longevity and sheer ambition and drive of Seiko Matsuda has guaranteed her the position of greatest ever, her music itself was mostly nothing much to write home about. Yamaguchi had way better tunes and like Saori Minami seems to have had her own opinions about music to have worked quite closely with her songwriters to make them happen. From her early days as a fourteen year-old being manipulated into singing songs begging men to take her virginity, by the late 70s she was rocking it for herself.Momoe Yamaguchi: Zettai Zetsumei

The Candies I’m long on record as being a massive fan of, and they and Pink Lady are pretty much the definitive girl groups of the day. This was a long time before the days of mass idol collectives, and two or three was a perfectly satisfactory number of members for a pop group back then. Sigh. I also mention a bit about some of the 60s singers who crossed over into the 70s era although their roots were strictly speaking in a rather earlier music industry environment. Linda Yamamoto was a wild girl but Chiyo Okumura had a sultry charm of her own and probably has a stronger catalogue.Chiyo Okumura: Koi Dorobou

I’m onto punk and new wave now, which is where the book comes back to my key points about how the music scene works and how it’s structured at grassroots level. Again, I’m not sure if I’m going to carry on doing this in order, and the music history segments aren’t really what the book’s about as a whole (I don’t want them to take up more than about 15-20% of the total page count), but it feels right having the background there since I’m going to be referring to a lot of this at various points. Anyway, more sooner or later, and enjoy the pop.

2 Comments

Filed under Blogs, Classic Pop

Movement (or not) towards a J/K-pop synthesis?

For a while now the two biggest Korean girl groups in Japan, Kara and Girls’ Generation, have represented contrasting ideas about what the best way to approach the audience here is, with the former adapting their Japanese material to the dreary standards of the local pop scene and the latter pushing onward with basically the same, more internationalised version of pop music that they’re selling at home. Which approach won out seemed important to me because it would have an impact on what the eventual response of Japan’s own pop artists would be — if Kara won, they could keep on doing what they were already doing and no reassessment was neceessary, but if the Girls’ Generation approach won, it would mean there was an audience here for a type of sound that local Japanese artists weren’t really providing.

Basically, it seems like the Girls’ Generation approach more or less won out with most Korean artists, probably out of convenience more than anything else, simply releasing Japanese language versions of the same songs they were releasing in Korea (usually with different videos and sometimes with minor cosmetic changes in the production and arrangement) rather than going all-in with the J-pop sound and trying to juggle two divergent but simultaneous careers. These days, even Kara’s Korean and Japanese material are more or less consistent with each other musically, with the main differences lying in the type of sexuality presented in the videos.

And in the end, I think the natural trajectory for Korean pop in the Japanese charts would have to be towards some sort of synthesis like this, with both Korean and Japanese artists converging towards some new kind of shared sound that combines elements of both types of pop.

Kara: Electric Boy

Much as I would have dearly liked the rumours of Yasutaka Nakata producing Kara’s latest Japanese single to be true, with Electric Boy they have actually gone with an overseas writing team. Even so, the result does point towards this synthesis between the light-and-fluffiness of J-pop and the squelchy, bleepy modernity of K-pop.

Girls’ Generation’s most recent Japanese single, Oh!, pulls a similar trick, taking a song that’s pretty fundamentally Western-influenced but playing it on the fluffy side.

Girls’ Generation: Oh!

Of course, Oh! has been around for years in its Korean language incarnation, so it’s really more a matter of the choice of material rather than writing anything new. Like Gee, it’s a catchy piece of throwaway, throwback pop that while it steers clear of mainstream trends in current J-pop, is hardly an alien intrusion into the Japanese musical landscape, not sounding a million miles from some of the Stock, Aitken & Waterman-influenced late-80s/early 90s synthpop confections of Wink and early Chisato Moritaka, albeit with a more modern production veneer.

The idea of going back a bit further into Japanese music history to find common points of reference is one I’ve talked about before, and it’s an idea that has been exploited quite strikingly by Orange Caramel, whose cheery style always seemed cut from another generation’s cloth and who recently made their Japanese debut with a cover of legendary 1970s Japanese idol trio the Candies’ classic Yasashii Akuma.

(You’ll have to go over to Daily Motion to watch the Orange Caramel version since Avex Trax still live in the stone age as far as videos go: Orange Caramel: Yasashii Akuma)

The fact is that Korean artists have in a number of different ways made big moves towards accommodating themselves to the Japanese music scene, while at the same time, usually bringing something of their own into the mix. However, synthesis really should be a two way thing, and it’s harder to see how, if at all, Japanese groups and producers have made moves of their own (any mention of E-girls is banned on here until further notice). Of course the Japanese pop fan nerdocracy might cry, “No! They shouldn’t do anything to pollute the glorious late-90s purity and unchanging majesty of J-pop!” but as I’ve pointed out, what many of the Korean groups mentioned above are doing is really repackaging something Japan used to do very well but has simply forgotten.

The weird shit that’s going down in idol music Japanside suggests that creative talent is in no especially short supply here, but that perhaps it’s being funnelled in directions with more niche (but by no means small) appeal and that Japan’s music production machine apparently remains creatively inward-looking. Progress is always slow, especially when so many big companies have huge amounts of money invested in a particular way of doing things, so while K-pop and idol music are cheap to buy in because other companies (either Korean or Japanese indies) have already done the work of creating and developing the acts, major labels seem to be less willing to take a risk with their own cash.

Leave a comment

Filed under Features

Strange Boutique (July 2011)

I have a big backlog of columns to update here, so I’ll start with July’s. Despite what some J-pop fans seem to think (judging from the complaint emails The Japan Times seems to receive from time to time), I’m not some angry K-pop partisan out to trash all Japanese pop music, but they are right insofar as I’m not at all impressed at all with the state of the mainstream pop scene in this country at the moment.

Things, however, were not always thus. The 1970s was a golden age for Japanese mainstream pop, for reasons that I tried to scratch the surface of in an earlier column, and so I returned to that theme over the summer for my top five picks of golden age girl pop songs. The article can be read in full on The Japan Times web site here, but I’ll add links to the songs I chose below.

Chiyo Okumura: Kitakuni no Aoi Sora (1967)

Saori Minami: Natsu no Kanjou (1974)

Momoe Yamaguchi: Hitonatsu no Keiken (1974)

Mari Natsuki: Natsu no Yoake wa Kanashii no (1976)

Candies: Shochuu Omimai Moshiagemasu (1977)

Leave a comment

Filed under Strange Boutique