Aprils: New Electric / High Flying Girl

The Aprils were part of the generation of bands that sprang up in the early 2000s heavily influenced by Shibuya-kei (their early stuff is pretty much a direct copy from Flipper’s Guitar) and which added the cheap, plastic synthetic sheen of the new wave revival that had sprung up a few years before around bands like Motocompo and Polysics. Artists from that scene have gone in various directions, with YMCK doubling down on their 8-bit jazz-pop schtick, Hazel Nuts Chocolate going from bright, sugar-coated nursery rhymes through frenetic breakbeat technopop hybrid to woozy, post-chillwave bedroom electronic pop. The closely related capsule, now officially “CAPSULE” since their switch of labels (and who I shall be calling Capsule in all subsequent uses) went on to become a huge influence on the mainstream through producer Yasutaka Nakata.

The Aprils took time off between 2005 and 2010, re-emerging with a brighter, more electropop sound that channeled some of the incessantly cheerful energy of idol music and worked in elements of pop culture nostalgia, particularly from the 80s. There are obviously elements of what Capsule did in reviving electropop with Perfume in that intervening 2005-2010 period, and you can hear various formerly Shibuya-kei-influenced groups settling on a similar sort of vocodered/autotuned pop around this time, with Candles and Sweet Vacation but two examples, and singers like Aira Mitsuki approaching the same sound from the idol direction.Aprils: New Electric

New Electric, off the January 2012 album Magical Girls, is atill a pretty accurate statement of where the band and a lot of their contemporaries remain musically. In a way, it’s sad to see music born from such an eclectic and musically adventurous ethos as Shibuya-kei (even if it was at times stultifyingly snobby) congeal around a sound as wishy washy and hollow as this. The Aprils are good at it and New Electric is a very accomplished example of the sound, but Motocompo have already been there and Yasutaka Nakata has already taken it way further than any of this generation of bands are even trying. it’s electric but it’s not really new.

The more recent High Flying Girl mixes things up a bit more, with the shouty chorus barging its way insistently to the fore and a more interesting combination of sounds competing for the listener’s attention in the background. It owes back more to the 80s than to anything really new, but more than that, it suggests that more than just genre merchants, the Aprils might have genuine mainstream pop songwriting appeal.Aprils: High Flying Girl

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